Wednesday, January 11, 2017

Breakfast Hot Cereals, Farina and Oatmeal

We've just had a blast of wintry temps and that brings thoughts of a warm, nourishing breakfast before heading out for the day.
 
Cereal and cold milk just doesn't satisfy when leaving to scrape ice from the car windows. In just a few more minutes you can prepare a piping hot and nutritious bowl of goodness.

Here are two of our favorites. Farina (Pic above), a form of milled wheat is made from the germ and endosperm of the grain. It is milled to a fine granular consistency and sifted, resulting in a carbohydrate-rich food. When enriched, it is one of the best sources of dietary iron available, some brands as much as 50% of the recommended daily amount. Farina has a fairly high protein content, even when cooked in water. A serving of 1 cup of prepared cereal has only about 120 calories and contains close to 4 grams of protein.

Farina was first produced by Pillsbury Company in 1898. Farina has been produced by U.S. Mills since 2001. U.S. Mills was founded in 1908, and made its first cereal: Uncle Sam Cereal, at that time. (source)

 Farina is mild tasting and delicious when sweetened with honey, brown sugar or maple syrup and and sprinkled with almonds or your favorite nuts. Be creative and stir in a dollop of your favorite jam and sweetener. Add a pat of butter and drizzle of cream, if desired.

Cooking directions are found on the back of the box and I prefer making with milk.

In my childhood home, huge bowls of oatmeal were served often. It filled our tummies and was inexpensive.

Daily consumption of a bowl of oatmeal can lower blood cholesterol, because of its beta-glucan content and it can help reduce the risk of heart disease when combined with a low-fat diet.

Rolled oats have a high content of complex carbohydrates and water-soluble fiber that encourages slow digestion and stabilizes blood-glucose levels. Oatmeal porridge also contains more B vitamins and calories than other kinds of porridges.

Our preference is the Old-fashioned cooking oats that take 5-minutes to cook. As with the Farina, topping the cooked oats with brown sugar, honey or sugar are all options as are additions of jam, fruit and nuts. Sometimes I dice up an apple and toss it into the pot with the oats with a dash of cinnamon and allow to cook together. We add the oats when the liquid begins to boil but if you like your oatmeal creamier, add the oats to the pot when you first add the water. 

Here are the cooking directions from the package:

Stove Top Preparation

To Make 1 Serving:
1/2 Cup Oats
1 Cup Water or Milk
Dash of salt (optional; for low sodium diets, omit salt)


To Make 2 Servings:
1 cup oats
1-3/4 Cups Water or Milk
1/8 Tsp. Salt (optional; for low sodium diets, omit salt)
Directions:

Boil water or milk and salt.
Stir in oats.
Cook about 5 minutes over medium heat; stir occasionally.

Microwave Preparation (1 Serving)

1/2 Cup Oats
1 Cup Water or Milk
Dash of salt (optional; for low sodium diets, omit salt)
Directions:

Combine water or milk, salt and oats in a medium microwave-safe bowl.
Microwave on HIGH 2 1/2 to 3 minutes; stir before serving.

5 comments:

Mildred said...

I've never tasted farina. This sounds/looks so tasty and satisfying for a cold morning. Wishing you a lovely day.

Karen said...

We always had grits in the South. This does look nourishing and tasty.

Regine Karpel said...

Great.

NanaDiana said...

Oh- I love oatmeal- I like the 5 minute one, too. It has more flavor, I think. I think my grandmother ate Farina every day of life until she went to live with my mother. xo Diana

SavoringTime in the Kitchen said...

I love a bowl of hot oatmeal on a cold, winter morning! I have yet to try Farina and should give it a try before it starts to warm up. It looks creamy and delicious and the extra iron is a bonus.

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