Saturday, March 6, 2010

Shamrock Milkshake

Similar to McDonald's Shamrock Shake, this version is not as thick, lighter in texture and flavor intensity. Very refreshing and enjoyable and you won't have to suck with all you might to get some through the straw to enjoy this minty milkshake.
After blending all of the ingredients together and pouring into glasses, I popped them into the freezer until nearly frozen, but still soft enough to stir with a spoon. Much better this way!

The McDonald's Shamrock Shake was first introduced in 1970. Shamrock Shakes were widely available across Canada and the United States until the early 1990s. They are still available at select American stores during the month of March. The Shamrock Shake typically appears in mid-February.
In 2008, McDonald's Canada brought back the Shamrock Shake for a limited time only starting on February 26. At that time, it had not been available in Canada for five years
(source: Wikipedia)
Here is the recipe I used:
Ingredients

  • 2 cups vanilla ice cream
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1/4 cup half and half (or just use milk)
  • 1/4 teaspoon mint extract (not peppermint)
  • 8 drops green food coloring
Directions

  1. Mix all ingredients on high speed until smooth.
  2. Stop blender, stir and blend again, if necessary, to combine
Below is another recipe I found and want to try. Sounds like it might be thicker:
Shamrock Shake

1 cup vanilla ice cream, slightly thawed
1/3 cup milk
2 tablespoons half-and-half
1/8 teaspoon mint extract
4 or 5 drops green food coloring
Jared & Abbey (taken about 2000) happily sporting their Shamrock Milkshake mustaches

Shadow Shot Sunday ~ Blue Wine Bottles

I saw these beautiful blue wine bottles while visiting my daughter, Erin. Only one was opened and I asked her if she would save the empty bottle for me. It was a blueberry wine and she gave me some to try. As I love blueberries, I loved this wine too!
She sent me home with both bottles!
The beautiful blue bottles with long, narrow necks produce a lovely shadow.
Erin bought the wine from Tomasello Winery located very close to her home.

From the Tomasello Winery Website:
Tomasello Winery's vineyards are located in the Atlantic and Camden counties of New Jersey. The vines grow in a sandy loam soil with a clay bottom. The soil is somewhat acidic (have you ever tasted the famous Jersey Tomato?) which benefits the acidity of the wine. Climate is Region 3 on the Davis scale.
Harvest generally commences during the last week of August through the first week of October. During dry seasons, the harvest parameters are typically high sugar with a strong underlying acidity.
This winery is located in a town called Hammonton which is known as the
"Blueberry Capital of the World".
So it is not surprising they would produce a wine such as this.

Tomasello Blueberry Wine

For over a decade Tomasello Winery has been producing 100% pure blueberry wine from cultivated high bush blueberries grown on the Atlantic Blueberry Company farms. The wine is semi-dry with soft and perfumed hints of blueberry. Recent studies prove Blueberry wine to be very high in antioxidants.

Abbey was holding a piece of fabric as a backdrop while I photographed these bottles. She told me to come and look at the back of the fabric to see how pretty the bottles looked shining through!
Shadow Shot Sunday is so much fun! Visit Hey Harriet to see the great shadows of other bloggers.

Thursday, March 4, 2010

Friday Photo Flashback

A little girl and her beloved guinea pig

A pet contest at PAWS Farm Nature Center
aww... look at those French Braids. Remember those?
sweet
Joining Alicia @More Than Words for Friday Photo Flashback.

~and~

Joining DebbieDoos Fun Foto Friday

Show and Tell Friday ~ The Language of Flowers

Here is a sweet little book I picked up long ago.
Jacket flap excerpt reads:

Father wanted to give Mother a present on their golden anniversary; instead of buying her a brooch or bracelet, he hit upon the happy plan of writing and illustrating a little book for her called The Language of Flowers, which has now been resurrected from some forgotten drawer and published.

Written by 'Father' to 'Mother' on occasion of their golden wedding anniversary, August 8, 1913. It is a sweet little dictionary of over 700 flowers and reminiscent of a gentler era when people found time to express their affection in an individual way.
There is a language, "little known",
Lovers claim it as their own.
Its symbols smile upon the land,
Wrought by Nature's wondrous hand;
And in their silent beauty speak,
Of life and joy, to those who seek
For Love Divine and sunny hours
In the language of the flowers.
F.W.L.,
The Language of Flowers, London, 1875
The language of flowers, sometimes called floriography, was a Victorian-era means of communication in which various flowers and floral arrangements were used to send coded messages, allowing individuals to express feelings which otherwise could not be spoken. This language was most commonly communicated through Tussie-Mussies, an art which has a following today.

The nuances of the language are now mostly forgotten, but red roses still imply passionate, romantic love and pink roses a lesser affection; white roses suggest virtue and chastity and yellow roses still stand for friendship or devotion. Also commonly known meanings are sunflowers, which can indicate either haughtiness or respect – they were the favorite flower of St. Julie Billiart for this reason. Gerbera (daisy) means innocence or purity. The iris, being named for the messenger of the gods in Greek mythology, still represents the sending of a message. A pansy signifies thought, a daffodil regard, and a strand of ivy; fidelity.

(source: Wikipedia)

Joining Cindy @My Romantic Home for Show & Tell Friday!

Wednesday, March 3, 2010

Sepia Scenes No. 73

A lamp I bought in Lancaster, PA close to 30 years ago.

A silk rose bouquet
Visit Mary T for More Sepia Scenes!

Tuesday, March 2, 2010

Outdoor Wednesday ~ Am I Lost?

How do you think a person like me, who has a poor sense of direction, feels when they see a sign like this?

I shot this picture from the car window as we drove down to Ocean City, NJ.
My dear husband explained it was probably directions to an information/tourist center.
I should have know that!

More interesting in bright colors!

Joining Susan @A Southern Daydreamer for Outdoor Wednesday

Monday, March 1, 2010

Honey Roasted Root Vegetables

Easy, healthy and tasty!
Works for me!
A really wonderful side dish from
My Recipes
Cooking Light

Yield: 8 servings (serving size: 1/2 cup) @ 118 calories per serving

Ingredients

  • 2 cups coarsely chopped peeled sweet potato (about 1 large)
  • 1 1/2 cups coarsely chopped peeled turnip (about 2 medium)
  • 1 1/2 cups coarsely chopped parsnip (about 2 medium)
  • 1 1/2 cups coarsely chopped carrot (about 2 medium)
  • 1/4 cup tupelo honey (see note below) or Honey of your choice
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 3 shallots, halved
  • Cooking spray

Preparation

Preheat oven to 450°.

Combine all ingredients except the cooking spray in a large bowl; toss to coat. Place vegetable mixture on a jelly-roll pan coated with cooking spray. Bake at 450° for 35 minutes or until vegetables are tender and begin to brown, stirring every 15 minutes.

NOTE: I have occasionally substituted potatoes for either the parsnips or turnips

TUPELO Honey

Clear yellow in color, with a characteristic greenish glow, Tupelo honey is a premium honey produced in northwest Florida. It is heavy bodied and is usually light golden amber with a greenish cast and has a mild, distinctive taste. Because of the high fructose content, Tupelo honey is one of the sweetest honey varieties and it hardly granulates.

source: Benefits of Honey.com

Minty Ice Cream Shamrocks

Not sure how much luck these ice-cream sandwich cookies will bring, but they will make your tummy happy!
Minty Ice Cream Shamrocks
Ingredients
  • 6 tablespoons butter, softened
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons milk
  • 3/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1-1/3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 cup baking cocoa
  • 1-1/4 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1-1/2 to 2 cups mint chocolate chip ice cream, softened

Directions

  • In a small bowl, cream butter and sugar. Add egg, milk and vanilla; mix well. Combine the flour, cocoa, baking powder and salt; gradually add to creamed mixture just until blended. Divide dough into two portions; flatten. Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate for 1 hour or until firm.
  • On a lightly floured surface, roll out dough to 1/8- to 1/4-in. thickness. Cut with a floured 3-in. shamrock cookie cutter. Place 2 in. apart on parchment paper-lined baking sheets. Prick with a fork if desired.
  • Bake at 350° for 7-10 minutes or until set. Cool for 2 minutes before removing from pans to wire racks to cool completely.
  • Spread 1/4 to 1/3 cup ice cream over the bottom of six cookies; top with remaining cookies. Wrap individually in plastic wrap; freeze. May be frozen for up to 2 months. Yield: 6 servings.
NOTE: I got 10 (20 cookies) nice thick servings.
Linking up with Foodie Friday!

Sunday, February 28, 2010

Our WeeWorld Family ~ Just For Fun

Abbey made these characters on her ipod using WeeMee app. They really do capture every one's personality!



LinkWithin

Related Posts with Thumbnails